Ellen McLaughlin - Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage



Posted by Ellen McLaughlin on 5/5/2019

The Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA) refers to mortgage refinancing as a crucial aspect of all mortgages. This is partly because comparatively, low mortgage interest rates have encouraged homeowners to restructure their financial situations using their home equity. Homeowners should base their refinancing decision on their circumstances rather than mortgage interest rates. Here are tips to consider when considering refinancing your mortgage: 

Home Equity

You need to have home equity before you can even consider refinancing your home mortgage. Home values are steadily rising which means that with conventional lenders, you can have enough equity to get a loan. Most lenders will allow a homeowner with at least 20% equity to get credit quickly.

Credit Score 

In recent years, lenders have made the requirement for loan approval stricter. Therefore, some consumers with good credit may not qualify for the lowest interest rates. Typically, the acceptable credit score by most lenders is 760 and above. Borrowers whose credit scores are not up to the satisfactory score may still obtain a new loan but with higher fees or interest rates.

Refinancing Cost

Refinancing costs usually take between three to five percent of the loan amount. Borrowers can look for ways to reduce this cost or incorporate it into the loan. The cost can also be rolled into a new loan if you have enough equity. With some lenders, you are likely to pay an interest rate that is slightly higher to balance the closing cost when you take a loan with them. Make sure that you negotiate and ask several lenders so that you get the best fees for your refinancing loan.

Rates vs. Term 

A borrower needs to have a goal when refinancing to know the exact mortgage product that is most favorable. If all you want is to reduce your monthly payment to the minimum, a loan with a long-term interest rate will be beneficial. If your goal is to pay a reduced interest rate over a short period, you should consider the lowest interest rate in the shortest term. 

Break-Even Point

Before deciding to refinance your mortgage, determine the break-even point. The break-even point is the time at which your monthly savings have covered your refinancing cost. Beyond this point, your monthly savings belong to you. This also means you know how long it will take before your refinancing makes sense if you intend to sell or move from the home in some years.

Mortgage refinancing can be quite confusing, so you need to be sure you completely understand the terms and conditions. Do your research and also speak to a financial planner to give you professional advice.




Categories: Mortgage   refinance   homeowners  


Posted by Ellen McLaughlin on 2/17/2013

RefinancingReason #1: Interest Rates are Forecasted to Rise.

The Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA), which is the national organization representing the real estate finance industry is forecasting a rise in interest rates for 2013 and 2014.

Reason#2: Your Adjustable Rate Mortgage Could Adjust Up.

If you find yourself with an ARM, it may be the perfect time to explore your options regarding fixed-rate mortgages. Interest rates fluctuated every month for 2011 and 2012, according to data provided by Informa Research Services, a leading information provider to the financial industry. With interest rates plunging to historic lows over the past few years, there's nowhere left to go but up. Which leads us to...

Reason#3: The Government's Financial Involvement is Expected to End Soon.

Ever since the recession in 2008, the government has been buying up mortgage debt from banks in an effort to stimulate the housing market. This is expected to end in the next two years, and it is anyone's guess when exactly this will take place. Refinancing now is much better than waiting until you start to see the signs of non-involvement, by which time it could be too late.

Reason#4: Cutting Down on Interest.

If you find yourself in a 30-year mortgage, it may be the best time to explore your options regarding a 15-year, fixed-rate mortgage. While your monthly payments would be higher, the amount of money you pay for your home would be significantly less. Interest payments on a 30-year mortgage can jack up the price of a home astronomically. While the monthly payments may have looked appealing initially, paying off the principal sooner will leave you much better off financially in the long run.




Categories: Financing